fbpx

Precision Philanthropy through emerging technologies

Precision Philanthropy through emerging technologies

Precision Philanthropy through emerging technologies

Understand how big data and emerging technologies can enhance our abilities to uncover efficiencies, discover important trends and patterns, and personalise philanthropy at scale. 

 

About this Masterclass

You’ve heard the buzzwords: big data, artificial intelligence, machine learning, natural language processing, business intelligence – but what does it all really mean?  

What is data? How is it really fuelling the next revolution in tech and nonprofits? How can you harness the data within your organisation with artificial intelligence technologies to begin to see significant impact on your operations and revenue generation? 

Learn how to leverage the newest technologies to sift through your small gift donors and find the ‘million-dollar donors’ you thought you never had. This masterclass will provide you with practical tips to walk away with a strategic roadmap for implementing cost saving and money-generating initiatives.  

 

Aimed at

  • This session is for any level and anyone connected to a social impact organisation – from a volunteer to staff and from any part of the organisation.  

 

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the ethical, social, and moral issues of utilising various forms of artificial intelligence for social impact organisations.  
  • A clear understanding of how machine learning, AI, and chatbots work and how to build them as cost effectively as possible. 
  • How to effectively partner with AI services and developers. 
  • Understand how to choose the right areas of service/stewardship/interaction to apply these powerful tools. 
  • Learn how to create pilots that can scale for incredible impact.  
  • Develop a unique roadmap for implementing artificial intelligence within your organisation, using our AI workbook. 

 

 

Register for IFC 2020

 

 

Data democratisation bootcamp: From strategy to implementation

Data democratisation bootcamp: From strategy to implementation 

Case studies, tactics and creative strategies to transform your organisation by putting data to work 

 

About this Masterclass

This masterclass will share a framework that will help participants identify what data opportunities exist within their organisation to help democratise data across your organisation.  

Democratising data means making it accessible to everyone, regardless of their technical abilities. By democratising your data, you will increase data-driven decisions which can result in accelerating revenue growth, deepening engagement among your supporters and ultimately making a greater impact serving your mission.  

Learn from practical use cases, examples of sophisticated machine learning applications, and develop tactics on how to move from strategy to implementation. 

 

Aimed at

  • Anyone from any business function who wants to learn more about how to increase data-driven decisions within their organisation.  

 

Learning outcomes

  • Understand how a data maturity framework can help formulate your organisation’s data strategy. 
  • How to identify data opportunities within your organisation that can help transform your fundraising and engagement programming. 
  • Learn tactics on how to move from strategy to implementation to democratise the data within your organisation. 

 

Register for IFC 2020

 

 

#CharitySoWhite // Intersecting inequalities

#CharitySoWhite // Intersecting inequalities: It is time for charities to take the lead in rooting out inequality in the sector

In this special Big Room session, we’ll hear from two leading voices on vital issues of inequality within the charity sector. Saba Shafi is one of the founding organisers of #CharitySoWhite, a campaign that began on Twitter, encouraging people to share their experiences of racism in the charity sector.

Dr Shola Mos-Shogbamimu is a New York Attorney and Solicitor of England & Wales who founded the Women in Leadership publication as a platform to drive positive change on topical issues that impact women globally through inspiring personal leadership journeys.

In this Big Room session, we’ll hear powerful presentations from both Saba and Dr Shola, before the two of them sit down for a free-flowing conversation on the issues raised.

Saba will reveal how the #CharitySoWhite campaign unearthed many powerful testimonials about experiences of racism from people of colour working in the social impact sector.

Racist thoughts, intentions, and actions are widespread in the sector. It’s not just about diversity in our workforce, it’s about our ability to deliver the impact we promise. We are falling behind others, when as a sector we should be taking the lead. This isn’t new information but too often we feel paralysed to act.

Dr Shola will explain why it is time for a conscious revolution through social mobilisation and political participation. Multiple representations today demand visibility on policies and decisions that can negatively impact their quality of life and choice.

Be it race, gender, sexuality, faith or other protected characteristics. Charities need to visibly intersect inequalities within their organisation and externally in the wider communities through mobilisation & participation.

Join Saba and Dr Shola for an urgent conversation and an open discussion on what it will take to tackle these issues in the charity sector.

 

Aimed at

  • Open to all

 

Learning outcomes

  • Understand intersecting inequalities
  • Actions to take to address exclusion and inequalities
  • Effective social mobilisation and political participation
  • A reframing of the conversation around race in the sector
  • An understanding of racism as something beyond the interpersonal
  • A clear and simple call to action.

 

Register for IFC 2019

 

What does being a changemaker really mean?

Are you a fundraiser? Or a changemaker? How accurately does your job description describe what you do? Is it narrow? Or does it propel you into the stratosphere of possibility? Using the human spectrogram model at the outset of the session, the panel will challenge you to describe yourself in terms of your work, then again at the end to see how your perception has changed. In between, speakers will engage in conversation around the way the world is changing, how the social impact sector is evolving around that change, and how your work and the way you do it are changing as well. This open-fishbowl format also will allow for audience questions and participation.

Format: Fishbowl

Fishbowls help facilitate discussion in large groups by situating three to six people in the centre of the room to carry on a discussion, while other participants listen in from the side lines. They can be closed, with the discussion exclusive to the selected participants, or open, where one of more of the chairs is available for members of the audience to take a seat and comment or ask questions. Fishbowls can also include human spectrograms, which is a cool and visual way to discern useful information about groups.

What does the next (r)evolution of our sector look like?

The social impact ecosystem is changing, and NGOs that can’t or won’t change with it simply won’t make it. Is your organisation poised to flourish – or fail – in the rapidly expanding age of new technologies, alternative funding models, new ways of working, and the digital transformation of just about every aspect of fundraising communication and supporter engagement? This presentation and ensuing discussion will open your mind to the new challenges and possibilities, what they look like to your organisation, and how you can follow the fast-paced evolutionary path into the future.

 

Format: Campfire

Campfire sessions begin a lot like a traditional presentation, with a speaker (or speakers) at the front of the room presenting an idea to a group of people. But after 15 or 20 minutes, the focus shifts as the presenter becomes a facilitator, inviting comments, insights and questions from those around the room. Be prepared to hunker down, dig in, and be part of the conversation.

Unplenary: What does innovation look like?

Did you walk out of the opening plenary wishing you had just a few more minutes of William Kamkwamba’s time? Did you have a question that was left unanswered? Or an insight of your own you would like to have shared with him? Here’s your opportunity to really get to know William, to share your thoughts with him and perhaps even get his input on some of your own challenges. Led by attendee questions and observations, William will dig deeper into the spirit and essence of innovation – and how you can harness it to move your own work forward.

 

Format: Fireside chat

Informal yet structured, fireside chats offer an opportunity to dig deeper into a speaker’s stories, background and ideas. A host will moderate a conversation with the guest of honor and incorporate participant questions into the conversation. Come ready with questions that the speaker might have left unanswered in their main session to join in the chat.

Follow your moral compass, but plan your route: Staying accountable to data protection regulations

It raises money, and the GDPR is silent. Shall we do it?

Following your moral compass when using personal data

“Not everything that is legally compliant and technically feasible is morally sustainable.” So said the “father of GDPR” Giovanni Buttarelli. But when the law is silent on how to interpret and apply the data protection principles, what should guide fundraisers?

How can you deliver effective fundraising that remains aligned to your core principles and upholds every donor’s personal privacy, rights and expectations?

In this session, Gary Shipsey will draw on his 15 years experience tackling the questions fundraisers face when using personal data for ever-more sophisticated and insightful fundraising practices.

The session will look at three topics and how Data Protection Impact Assessments (DPIAs) hold the key to raising money whilst complying with data protection law.

I know his son’s favour animal!

How far should prospect research go?

  • Can you use Facebook, Twitter and other publicly-available personal data for your fundraising purposes?
  • Would you use what you learn about a child without consent?
  • When will you tell them what you’ve learnt?

They want emails from us!

Can you profile people to decide what communication suits them best?
  • How can you justify profiling to tailor communications and deepen engagement?
  • What could genuine choice look like?
  • Can you send email addresses to Facebook without consent to acquire new supporters?
It’s in our privacy policy!
If your privacy policy says it, does that make it ok?
  • What if your privacy policy isn’t read?
  • Does anyone understand what you are doing with their data?
  • How can we bring people with us?

Aimed at:

  • Those who think data protection is a blocker rather than an enabler
  • Those who think data protection is just a tick box exercise

 

Learning outcomes:

  • Data protection is there for a reason
  • Data protection is an enabler, not a blocker
  • It’s all about the culture!

 

Register for IFC 2019

 

Preparing civil society for the fourth industrial revolution

Preparing civil society for the fourth industrial revolution

Civil society organisations—including humanitarian, development, advocacy, children’s rights and community organisations—face significant challenges in responding to the emerging fourth industrial revolution.

These include understanding the implications of technological change for vulnerable populations, developing robust and responsible digital and technology strategies, and building related organisational capacities: digital security, talent and skills.

The nature of fast-paced technological change means that civil society organisations cannot change on their own, or in silos.  Companies, donors, academia and civil society organisations themselves have significant roles to play in driving organisational and systems change towards thriving civil societies in the fourth industrial revolution.

This Big Room session looks at how knowledge sharing, cross-sector collaboration and multi-stakeholder investment will be needed both to accelerate civil society’s readiness for the fourth industrial revolution and ensure that organisations across the sector can continue to effectively play much needed roles in the fourth industrial revolution, including:

  • protecting vulnerable populations
  • championing human rights
  • emphasising participatory and inclusive approaches and providing critical services
  • meaningfully participating in addressing technology governance challenges with other stakeholders.

Aimed at:

This Big Room session is for you if you’re interested in:

  • Providing a broader multi-stakeholder platform for discussion and cross-sector learning across ongoing expert civil society networks on innovation and technology
  • Connecting academia, philanthropy and the private sector with a network of 200 regional and global expert civil society leaders in innovation, digital and emerging technologies
  • Helping to create, contextualise and disseminate critical strategic intelligence on digital and emerging technology for broader understanding and guidance for civil society organisations
  • Building evidence for change through both accelerating existing initiatives and co-creating multi-stakeholder “prototypes” for collective action and evidence aimed to scale civil society learning and innovation

Learning outcomes:

The project this Big Room session is based on covers numerous areas and will touch on the following:

  • Responsible digital transformation for social impact
  • Minimising tradeoffs for technology for good projects
  • Group data and human rights
  • Mobilising and inspiring action with technology
  • Practical digital security support for civil society
  • Future of nonprofit work and talent
  • Future of civil society: New organisations, models and dynamics in the fourth industrial revolution

Register for IFC 2019

 

Safeguarding the news, protecting the public sphere: The Guardian’s journey to becoming supporter-led

Safeguarding the news, protecting the public sphere: The Guardian’s journey to becoming supporter-led

The world is changing and changing at a rapid pace. Huge advancements in technology have changed us all and critically changed how we interact with the world around us, the charities we support and the commercial brands we buy from. We want things quicker and we demand the very best experiences.

To prepare ourselves for the disruption that is undoubtedly coming we need to look outside of the charity bubble and find inspiration from other organisations who have also experienced rapidly changing business models and thrived.

The Guardian is one of these organisations. Before a revolutionary switch to a membership and contributions model, the newspaper was primarily funded by print subscriptions and advertising.

When this no longer became a sustainable solution, it began exploring alternative options.

The first iteration of its membership scheme launched in 2014 and was primarily an events led programme, before a significant shift in the way its audience was asked to support in 2017, pivoting from memberships to asking readers for contributions.

In late 2018, the Guardian announced that it had received financial contributions from more than one million people around the world over the last three years and in 2019 it announced that it had broken even – the aim of its three-year turnaround plan.

In this Big Room session, Amanda Michel, the Guardian’s Global Director for Contributions will share her experiences from launching and managing this highly successful contributions programme.

Amanda will reveal lessons learnt from her time spearheading these changes and how the Guardian model has become a ‘for-public-good’ newspaper, with readers supporting its journalism through a mixture of recurring and single contributions, print and digital subscriptions and its patrons scheme.

 

Aimed at:

Nonprofits, charities, news organisations, start-ups, those who work on membership and contributions schemes and programmes.

 

Learning outcomes:

  • Why the Guardian embraced a mixed model
  • Sources of growth
  • Learnings and implications of being supporter-led.

 

Register for IFC 2019

Creating, testing, funding, and spinning out a new start-up business

Hear how Versus Arthritis created, tested, won funding, and then spun-out a new venture, delivering both income and impact 

In this session hear how Versus Arthritis have created, tested, won significant internal investment for, and then spun out a new venture designed to deliver both commercial income and help people living with arthritis. 

We’ll take you through the result of two years of work. We’ll share how we audited our assets and capabilities to uncover the initial idea and what we did to scope it out. We’ll share how we created a minimum viable product to test it in the real world to prove to our board that this has significant potential. 

We’ll share the highs and lows of taking the charity and our trustees on the journey of investing in something that was very new and different. And we’ll share the thinking behind why we decided to create a new startup company and spin the idea out rather than just treat it as another internal initiative. 

 

Aimed at: 

  • Fundraising directors / heads  
  • Income generation directors / heads  
  • CEOs 
  • Strategy directors / heads 
  • Trustees
     

Learning outcomes: 

  • How to find new ways to generate income that’s isn’t fundraising – it’s commercial 
  • How to test, prove, and gain confidence in the idea to enable you to ask for significant investment
  • What to look out for when going through the process of engaging execs and trustees 
  • How to set up a new venture properly so your culture and governance doesn’t kill it. 

Videogames and livestreaming: An interactive workshop about interactive entertainment

The videogames industry is now worth $116 billion, twice as much as music and movies combined. It’s interactive, so the potential for meaningful engagement and storytelling is extremely rich. In fact, some of the most up-and-coming influencers have achieved their status because other people like watching them play videogames. It may not be your traditional demographic, but that may be about to change.  

This workshop will aim to debunk the myths our sector has about the gaming industry and explain in detail who the key influencers are and their motivations. This interactive workshop will be led by Twitch, the world’s biggest videogame streaming platform; Tiltify, the specialists in streamer fundraising; and War Child UK, a charity that has built videogames and livestreaming into their fundraising strategy. 

This workshop is designed to complement the Big Room session The brave new world of videogames and live stream fundraising. We will aim to inspire and inform you about how videogaming and livestreaming are being used to raise funds for good causes. The presenters will deliver a condensed version of the Big Room content, which will then allow time to split off into three smaller groups. The smaller groups will then become interactive mini-workshops to help you explore new ideas and how you may be able to apply them to benefit your organisation. 

 

Aimed at: 

If you’re interested in engaging gamers, content creators, Gen Zs, and millennials; cutting-edge fundraising; community fundraising; corporate fundraising; or comms and brand, then this session is for you.  

 

Learning outcomes: 

Participants will leave with an understanding of: 

  • How interactive entertainment can enhance a charitable call to action 
  • How videogaming and livestreaming are being used to raise funds for good causes 
  • How you can use livestream fundraising to benefit your organisation 
  • Who are the key online influencers and what are their motivations, limitations, and potential impact 
  • Real world examples of success, failure, learning, and innovation.  

The brave new world of videogames and live streamer fundraising: Are you engaging with online streamers or videogamers as a potential route for generating income? If not, why not?

The videogames industry is now worth $116 Billion, twice as much as music and movies combined. It’s interactive so the potential for meaningful engagement and storytelling is extremely rich. In fact, some of the most up and coming influencers have achieved their status because other people like watching them play videogames. It may not be your traditional demographic but that may be about to change.  

 

This Big Room Session will debunk the myths our sector has about working with the gaming industry and explain in detail who the key influencers are and their motivations. You’ll hear from Twitch, the world’s biggest videogame streaming platform and Tiltify the specialists in streamer fundraising and War Child UK, a charity that has built videogames and live streaming into their fundraising strategy. 

 

Aimed at: 

If you’re interested in: engaging gamers and content creators, GenZ’s, and Millenials; cutting-edge fundraising; community fundraising; corporate fundraising; comms and brand then this session is for you. 

 

Learning outcomes: 

1) A crash course in the videogaming ecosystem including – gamers, streamers, developers and platforms. 

2) How interactive entertainment can enhance a charitable call to action. 

3) Understanding the motivations, limitations and potential impact of streamers and online influencers. 

4) Real world examples of success, failure, learning and innovation. 

Unscrambled tech: Getting moving with voice technology

From smart phones and smart speakers to tech worn on your arm and embedded in your car, we are becoming increasingly used to having voice interfaces all around us. But just how are consumers around the world actually making use of voice technology and what does this mean with regard to real opportunities for non-profits to use it in support of their social impact and fundraising activities?

In this session, Puff and Bryan will share research on how voice usage is evolving, highlight some of the key opportunities for non-profits, and offer tips and advice for anyone wishing to test voice applications themselves. They’ll also take a look at some of the best and worst Alexa Skills around and share lessons learned hands-on from the challenges and opportunities encountered through projects including adding voice to the very successful American Red Cross disaster app. 

 

Aimed at: 

Anyone keen to achieve a clearer understanding of voice technology and the related opportunities for non-profits, and particularly non-technical senior staff who feel they should understand more of this tech stuff but can never quite find the time.

 

Learning outcomes: 

  • A good understanding of the trends relating to voice technology
  • How this technology is being adopted by consumers and used by commercial and non-profit organisations
  • What makes-up some of the best and worse voice applications around 
  • Tips and advice for anyone wishing to test voice applications within their own organisations

Unscrambled tech: Understanding artificial intelligence

With new applications being highlighted pretty well every week, artificial intelligence looks like it will be this year’s top tech buzzword, and it is attracting a lot of attention across the non-profit sector worldwide.

If you’re unsure quite where to start when thinking about AI and interested in just how it might be relevant to your organisation in the future, then come and spend a 90 minutes with Bryan and Puff as they unscramble this fascinating and fast developing area of tech. They’ll talk you through through just what AI is (and isn’t), examine ways it is being used in the commercial and non-profit sectors, and touch on the potential ethical and cause-related challenges it might represent for non-profits in the future. 

 

Aimed at: 

Anyone keen to achieve a clearer understanding of artificial intelligence and the related opportunities for non-profits, and particularly non-technical senior staff who feel they should understand more of this tech stuff but can never quite find the time. 

 

Learning outcomes: 

  • An understanding of what is meant by artificial intelligence and the wide range of ways it is already being used in everyday life
  • An understanding of the range of AI applications specifically relevant to non-profits – both in support of social impact and operational support activities 
  • Practical steps to further the understanding and application of artificial intelligence within your own organisation

Artificial intelligence. Authentic connection: New technologies for deeper, more precise donor communications

Masterclasses are six and a half hours of intensive learning over two days. IFC masterclasses have a limited number of attendees so you will experience more powerful conversation, more intense exploration, and more deep-dive learning with an intimate group of delegates.

Register for IFC 2019

 

Artificial intelligence. Authentic connection: New technologies for deeper, more precise donor communications

We all know that philanthropy speaks to the heart and that fundraising is human-centred. This is an undeniable truth.

But it’s 2019, and we as human fundraisers have a wealth of technology – under the umbrella term of “artificial intelligence” – literally at our fingertips to make our job easier and enhance the human connection that is so crucial to what we do.

This “precision philanthropy” makes it possible for us to reach out in the most targeted and compelling ways: a win for both the organisation (which gets the best results for its resources) and for donors (who get only the most relevant messaging). Ultimately, it’s the biggest win for the people and missions we support.

AI includes innovations like chatbots and machine learning – things that don’t necessarily sound conducive to making those heart connections that inform our work. But this hands-on masterclass will explain how AI has shifted approaches in fundraising and will explore the economic advantages of this powerful set of technological tools.

Join us for this highly interactive and engaging masterclass facilitated by global technology innovation expert Michael Johnston and AI pioneer Nathan Fay of the world-leading cancer organisation City of Hope.

Together, they will share social impact case studies from Charity:Water, UNICEF, City of Hope, and others – from China to Holland to Italy to the United States – and dive deep into how they are exploring and applying the precision philanthropy that comes from AI to create new predictive opportunities that they can act upon.

This masterclass will prepare you for a brave new world of machines that will help us make the human world a better place! And what’s more, every participant will receive a copy of Nathan’s new book: Precision Philanthropy.

This masterclass will take participants through a one-of-a-kind six step process to become an AI-ready social impact leader:

  • Step 1: An introduction to artificial intelligence
    Learn about the history of AI, its role in collective intelligence, and how to gain strategic advantage in the nonprofit sector.
  • Step 2: Machine learning in the nonprofit sector
    Explore what machine learning is and how it can be applied to gain strategic advantage in the nonprofit sector.
  • Step 3: Natural language processing in the nonprofit sector
    Explore what NLP is and how it can be applied to voice recognition systems (like Alexa) and chatbots to gain strategic advantage in the nonprofit sector.
  • Step 4: Robotics in the nonprofit sector
    Explore robotics and how robots can be used in a nonprofit business context for service delivery and to maximize humanitarian impact.
  • Step 5: The role of artificial intelligence and its influence in humanity
    Consider the merits of the human-machine partnership in the social sector and any ethical concerns that may arise from the use of AI in a philanthropic environment.
  • Step 6: The future of artificial intelligence in philanthropy
    Develop your own roadmap for implementing AI within your nonprofit / social sector organization and consider the future of nonprofit businesses that use AI technologies to augment philanthropic giving, engagement, and service delivery.

 

Aimed at:

This session will provide knowledge, skills, and takeaways on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and chatbots for all levels of an organization, from executive leadership to day-to-day tactical staff.

 

Learning outcomes:

  • Participants will be well versed in the ethical, social, and moral issues of chatbots, machine learning, and artificial intelligence for social impact organisations
  • Participants will clearly understand how machine learning, AI, and chatbots work and how to build them as cost affordably as possible – and how to effectively partner with AI services and developers
  • Participants will understand how to choose the right areas of service/stewardship/interaction to apply these powerful tools and how to create pilots that can scale for incredible impact
  • Participants will have a six step AI workbook to develop their own unique roadmap for implementing artificial intelligence within their organization.

Masterclasses are six and a half hours of intensive learning over two days. IFC masterclasses have a limited number of attendees so you will experience more powerful conversation, more intense exploration, and more deep-dive learning with an intimate group of delegates.

Register for IFC 2019

 

How to use data science to uncover hidden income opportunities and find new audiences: Learn the framework and the algorithms to transform data into useful (and ready to apply) information

In this session, we will share cases from Greenpeace Brazil and Mexico where data from different fundraising and engagement systems, such as CRM, inbound marketing tools, social listening platforms, and payment gateways, was gathered, cleaned, and analysed with a set of statistical and machine learning algorithms. Once both transactional and behaviour clusters were identified, we were able to predict who would cancel and when, who would accept an upgrade appeal, and who would be the inactive donors with the most probability to be reactivated.

After this workshop, you will understand how to use this type of information to get out of your usual bubble and how to identify new and high potential audiences. This workshop is more than just looking at results – we will also the share both the framework and algorithms that you need to setup in your organisation! 

 

Aimed at: 

  • Executive directors 
  • Fundraising, growth, mobilization, outreach, and development professionals 
  • Data scientists
  • Digital fundraisers, inbound, and content marketing specialists

 

Learning outcomes: 

  • Understand how artificial intelligence can be benefit a fundraising program 
  • Learn how to implement a data science framework (and what skills are necessary)  
  • Move from a simple transactional data perspective (CRM) to a behaviour analysis (inbound marketing and social listening)  

Intro to innovation bootcamp: The tools and tactics you need to start a culture of innovation tomorrow

Masterclasses are six and a half hours of intensive learning over two days. IFC masterclasses have a limited number of attendees so you will experience more powerful conversation, more intense exploration, and more deep-dive learning with an intimate group of delegates.

Register for IFC 2019

 

Intro to innovation bootcamp: The tools and tactics you need to start a culture of innovation tomorrow

 

Innovation doesn’t need huge budgets or big teams. It needs a new way of thinking. The introduction to innovation bootcamp will give participants everything they need to start their own innovation journey. Over the two days we’ll share inspiring examples and lessons from the field, give each participant a practical toolkit and everyone will have the opportunity to work together to problem-solve any existing barriers.

 

Aimed at:

This session is aimed at anyone who thinks that their team needs to start doing things differently, but doesn’t know where to start. It will be valuable for people who have tried to do something new, but haven’t seen great results yet.

 

Learning outcomes:

  • Practical tools for responding to disruption in the fundraising market
  • Inspiring examples of charities and commercial organisations who have failed or succeeded at innovation
  • Tools and tactics to help promote a culture of innovation in your workplace.

 

Masterclasses are six and a half hours of intensive learning over two days. IFC masterclasses have a limited number of attendees so you will experience more powerful conversation, more intense exploration, and more deep-dive learning with an intimate group of delegates.

Register for IFC 2019

 

Innovation Camp 2019

Masterclasses are six and a half hours of intensive learning over two days. IFC masterclasses have a limited number of attendees so you will experience more powerful conversation, more intense exploration, and more deep-dive learning with an intimate group of delegates.

Register for IFC 2019

Innovation Camp 2019

Everyone is talking about innovation. The message seems to be “Innovate or die!”

But what does it mean? What does it really mean to innovate? And how do you do it? Beyond the theory of “innovation,” what do you do? What steps do you take? Where do the ideas come from, and how do you move from idea to action?

Here’s where you find out.

Innovation Camp provides an inspirational and collaborative environment where you will learn, share, find solutions to your challenges, and become a more powerful catalyst for innovation in your organisation. You’ll hear from leading changemakers and social entrepreneurs from outside and inside the sector and be provoked and inspired about how to drive change in your NGO. The masterclass will be a fast-moving mix of inspiration and hands-on advice from breakthrough NGO innovators, plus working sessions where you and your colleagues will address the challenges you face every day.

Innovation Camp covers the issues that drive innovation:

Inspiration – What is happening in the market that we need to understand – digital disruption and other trends, tech transformation, storytelling.
Strategy – What processes, models and ways of working will transform your organisation’s performance through a more strategic approach?
Culture – How can you innovate with collaborators, provide personal leadership on innovation, and build a high-performing team that innovates as second nature?

Innovation Camp will help you navigate these challenges:

Adapting to the new world. Today one dedicated activist can now start her own organization on Facebook or Twitter or Instagram, build a huge following, and raise money via crowdfunding. So where does this leave our NGOs, our bureaucracies, our jobs – and how can we build engagement as quickly and as cheaply as the startups do?

Responding to the unexpected. Improv performers always say, “Yes…and.” To make innovation, improvisation is critical, so when innovation takes us out of our comfort zone, how can we respond to challenges by listening, building and nurturing?

Becoming a better storyteller. Since the beginning of history, storytelling has been what engages us and shapes our perspective. So what’s your personal story, your innovation story, your organisation’s story? We will help you work that out, so you can inspire others around your vision for innovation.

Here’s the speaker lineup so far:

–Kaz McGrath, co-founder of the Ration Challenge, a campaign infused with brand new ways of raising funds and awareness specifically focused on the global refugee crisis. She’s committed her next 20 years to asking traditional organizations to update their way of doing things so that we can finally transform the largest challenges of our time.

–Mike Conway, the emotional agility and mental coach for the Socceroos, Australia’s national football team. An expert in emotional intelligence, he’s also a TV producer and the creator of the XVenture Family Challenge TV series in Australia and New Zealand

— Ellen Janssens, one of the organizers of Innovation Camp, will discuss Greenpeace Netherlands’ new “open campaign” by developed in cooperation volunteers and supporters, as well as the Innovate for Good initiative, where Dutch NGOs and startups innovate together.

— An “improv” trainer who will show us how to use improv and storytelling to move innovation forward in our organisations and among our donors

— Felipe Pascoa, who works on innovation, growth hacking, and machine learning / predictive –analysis projects at Amnesty International, SOS Children Villages, Transparency International, and Greenpeace. He is a partner at Trackmob in Sao Paulo.

–Juan Cruz Mones, director of global innovation at UNICEF in Geneva.

The minute you sign up, you’ll join a global online community where you can start sharing your challenges, your successes, and your failures in testing new ways of engagement, fundraising, and communications.

Aimed at:

Innovation Camp will be most useful to experienced fundraisers who:

  • Want to understand how innovation could transform their organisation
  • Want to introduce new ways of doing things at their organisations
  • Are fully charged with leading innovation and driving culture change.

Learning outcomes:

  • How you find and learn from inspiration inside and outside the NGO sector
  • How to lead strategic innovation in your organisation — and how to deal with the challenges you may face
  • How to best navigate through the that’s-how-we-do-it attitudes, silos, and resistance to rethinking old ways of fundraising.

Masterclasses are six and a half hours of intensive learning over two days. IFC masterclasses have a limited number of attendees so you will experience more powerful conversation, more intense exploration, and more deep-dive learning with an intimate group of delegates.

Register for IFC 2019

 

 

Unscrambled tech: Understanding the ever-changing world of emerging technology and spotting the real opportunities for non-profits

Masterclasses are six and a half hours of intensive learning over two days. IFC masterclasses have a limited number of attendees so you will experience more powerful conversation, more intense exploration, and more deep-dive learning with an intimate group of delegates.

Register for IFC 2019

 

Unscrambled tech: Understanding the ever-changing world of emerging technology and spotting the real opportunities for non-profits

 

Artificial intelligence, blockchain, cryptocurrency, voice interfaces, 3D printing … the list goes on. With new digital developments arising all the time, it can be a tough challenge to navigate all the buzzwords and understand which emerging technologies really offer opportunities you can implement within your organisation right now.

It is time to unscramble those emerging technologies.

In this masterclass, we will help you to see through the hype, get up to speed with the latest digital trends, and adopt a more strategic approach to how your organisation can prioritise testing digital opportunities.

What will be unscrambled?

  • Why does digital fundraising so often fail to deliver on expectations?
  • What’s happened to the blockchain revolution?
  • What is driving the current excitement around artificial intelligence and how might that help make your work more efficient and effective?
  • Right now, should you be investing your precious time and budgets in encouraging donors to give through voice interfaces, trying to engage them with immersive VR content, or something else entirely?

Join us for this practical tour into the world of mysterious tech and leave inspired, invigorated, and unscrambled.

 

Aimed at:

Anyone feeling a little lost in the cluttered world of new technologies and wanting to get a clearer understanding of the real opportunities on offer and how to balance these with more mainstream digital activity.

Designed particularly for non-technical staff who know they should probably understand this stuff but never have the time to get their head around it all, this masterclass will unscramble all the jargon and buzzwords to help you and your teams make better use of digital in support of your work.

 

Learning outcomes:

  • This masterclass will delve into the details of mobile, voice interaction, artificial intelligence, and blockchain (and more), assessing these alongside more developed digital opportunity areas to help you prioritise what mix is right for your organisation.
  • Case studies, use cases, tips, and tools will help you to understand how you can apply different technologies and test new ideas.
  • Group exercises will help to make all the theory real, equipping you with knowledge and new ideas to help focus your staff resources and budget.

Masterclasses are six and a half hours of intensive learning over two days. IFC masterclasses have a limited number of attendees so you will experience more powerful conversation, more intense exploration, and more deep-dive learning with an intimate group of delegates.

Register for IFC 2019